"Jacob Have I Loved, Esau Have I Hated" Malachi 1:2–3 in Romans 9–11

In Romans, Paul says that he has received apostleship in order to bring about the obedience of faith for the sake of the nations, including the church in Rome (Romans 1:1–4; see also Romans 16:25–27). As he takes the gospel to the nations, he is convinced that “Christ became a servant to the circumcised to show God’s truthfulness, in order to confirm the promises given to the patriarchs, and in order that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy” (Romans 15:8–9). But among the joy of the gospel going to the nations, there is a source of great pain for Paul. Many of his fellow Israelites have rejected the gospel. This raises a central question regarding God’s truthfulness and his promises to the patriarchs—how has God been faithful to his promises to Abraham if Abraham’s children are rejecting the promised Messiah?

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Mark Catlin
"How Have You Loved Us?" Malachi 1:1–5

Malachi writes at a time in which God has begun to fulfill his promises to Israel as many have returned from exile in Babylon and they have rebuilt the temple. Yet something seems amiss. God doesn’t appear to be doing all that he promised, and the people seem to be losing hope that he will ever do what he said. They begin to ask some hard questions. So Malachi connects the people of God to the story of Scripture so that they might respond faithfully to their God.

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Mark Catlin
Why Malachi?

In our renewed purpose for the blog, we seek to show how the Scriptures call people to join the mission of God through the biblical story. If you want to know why we’re doing this, then check out this video and take the challenge. Achieving this goal requires showing how individual texts are connected to the larger biblical narrative. As we relaunch the blog, we will first work through the book of Malachi. Why begin there?

  1. It’s short

  2. Its use of the Old Testament

  3. Its influence on the New Testament

  4. It’s practical

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Mark Catlin
Renewed Purpose for the Blog

Novum has recently clarified its mission to help pastors call, equip, and encourage for every good work. If you're interested in learning more about this, then check out this video and blog post. With this clarified mission to serve pastors and other teachers of Scripture, we are developing several new resources and repurposing old resources. The Novum Teaching Model, developed in the booklet “God is Making All Things New: Introducing the Bible as Story,” is a new resource that lays down the biblical foundation for all of our resources. You can download this booklet here. The Novum blog will now become a repurposed free resource that helps pastors and teachers with a very specific and important aspect of the Novum Teaching Model.

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Mark Catlin
Pursuing All of Life as Ministry

Over the years I’ve had the privilege of meeting with many students as they figure out what vocation they want to venture into. Many of them have wrestled with the question “Should I go into ministry?” Often they are deciding whether to go into the corporate world or into professional ministry.” It seems like they must choose between two things they love—doing work in the world or doing ministry for God. But what if their work in the world were ministry for God? How would they be equipped for such a task? Novum is here to help answer these questions. 

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Mark Catlin
Championing the Role of the Pastor

At Novum we believe that God desires his people to pursue all of life as ministry. At the heart of our conviction is that the Bible tells the story of God making all things new. If his work includes all creation, then so does the church's ministry. One beautiful aspect of this vision is that one can suddenly see how each local church is involved in God's global mission. Wherever the members go each week, that's exactly where God has sent them for ministry. Thus, teaching the Bible as the story of God making all things new has the power to multiply the ministry of the church without adding a new program, hiring any new staff, or busting the budget. But in so doing, have we diminished the role of the minister, the pastor? Not at all! If the role of the pastor is to equip the people of God, then this vision elevates the role of pastors as equipping ministers, especially in their preaching and teaching of the Bible.

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Mark Catlin
So That the World May Know

A Facebook friend of mine who works for a Methodist church suggests donating to Catholic Charities. Articles describe local Presbyterian, Pentecostal, and nondenominational churches coming together to pack and distribute food. A common sense of mission unified the church across denominational lines. If Jesus asks us as Christians to care for “the least of these,” this sort of interdenominational cooperation, or ecumenism, seems like the obvious thing to do in a situation like Harvey. Churches realize that they share a common mission, and thus come together. But why does this happen only after disaster?

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Kacie Klamm
Witnesses to the Resurrection

As they decide who will join them, they give a summary statement that defines the mission of these apostles. Their mission, stated in its shortest form, is to be witnesses to the resurrection. At the founding of the church, these witnesses to the resurrection are those who literally walked with Jesus from the beginning of his ministry all the way through seeing the resurrected body of Jesus.

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Mark Catlin